How to Pack Wisely- Tips for Frequent Travelers

Aside from booking airfare tickets, packing up is one of the most challenging tasks that savvy travelers have to endure. Well, this applies to almost everyone, except for those who squeeze a year’s worth of stuff in their bags for a week long holiday vacation. On the other hand, some travelers pack too lightly, so much so that they forget to bring the most essential things like medicines and even passport! Listed here are some suggestions on how to pack wisely.

– Pack only the clothes that you will really use. Stuffing all your wardrobe in your bag is never a wise way to pack even if you are traveling for more than a month. For longer travels, you can just bring just a reasonable number of items to wear and wash them right after using.

– Roll your clothes. Instead of folding your outfits individually, you can maximize the space of your travel bag by rolling them. This packing technique works best with skirts, pants, and shirts. Another recommended method is folding clothes together to prevent wrinkles or creases in the folds.

– Keep a digital copy of your important documents. Misfortunes such as lost passport and stolen credit cards can happen even to the most careful travelers. You will never know when they will strike, so it always pays to be prepared. Scan your passport, tickets, and other travel documents and send the digital copies to your email. You must also keep a copy of the emergency hotlines of your credit card or ATM card, which will come in handy in case it gets lost or stolen.

– If you’re using a backpack, put all the stuff you use most often on top. That way, you won’t have to rummage through all the contents of your bag just to get a single item. You can make your bag feel lighter by putting the heavier items on top and the lighter ones at the bottom, as this makes the pack rest on your lower back.

– Use airtight plastic bags. Doings so helps eliminate the mess that comes from the toiletries and dirty clothes. Plastic bags are handy because they can keep the contents of your bag organized and neat. Sort the items according to type (e.g. toiletries, underwear, shorts, etc.) and put them into different plastic bags. This makes accessing a particular item a lot easier.

– Put all your valuables in a carry-on bag. It helps to bring a bag that you can take with you all the time so that you can easily access important items like medicines, cash, and mobile phone. Your carry-on bag should be small enough to keep under the seat and large enough to accommodate larger items like laptop and gadgets.
– Bring only a few toiletries. Don’t stack up on toiletries in your baggage as if tomorrow’s the end of the world. Also, store items such as shampoo and toothpaste in small containers. You will be surprised at the amount of space you are going to save.

All these tips on how to pack wisely boil down to one important point: do not overpack your baggage for the sake your safety and convenience.

The Eight Most Famous Travel Books

Selecting the best travel books is not as easy as it may seem due to a wide array of available literature since travel writing has been invented. Coming up with a list should not be easy as well. The following books are the ones most cited while some are bestsellers.

Let us start with “The Road to Oxianai. Modern travel writers deem this book the first model of great travel writing. It is an account of Byron’s ten-month journey to Persia and Afghanistan in 1933-34.

Another classic of travel literature is “A Time of Gifts” written by Patrick Leigh Fermor. It was published in 1977 when he was 62. The book is an account of Fermor’s first part journey on foot across Europe in 1933-34. His journey began at Hook of Holland and ended in Constantinople. The second volume is titled Between the Woods and the Water and published in 1986. It covered Fermor’s journey through Maria Valeria Bridge, Hungary, and Iron Gate.

Meanwhile, “In Patagonia” is an English travel book authored by Bruce Chatwin and published in 1977. The book, which established Chatwin’s reputation as a travel writer, was awarded the Hawthornden Prize and E.M. Forster Award.

Chatwin went to Patagonia both to fulfill a promise made to a 93-year-old architect and designer Eileen Gray and out of his own curiosity. Chatwin spent six months in Patagonia and wrote the book.

Another outstandingly written travel book is authored by Eric Newby. Titled “A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush,” it is an autobiographical account of Newby’s journey in the Hindu Kush, which is around the Nuristan Mountains of Afghanistan.

“The Great Railway Bazaar” is a notable 1975 travelogue by American novelist Paul Theroux. Many consider this book a classic in travel writing. It tells about Theroux four-month journey across Asia by train. Theroux travelled through Europe, Middle East, Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia. In his return, he passed via the Trans-Siberian Railway.

Theroux retraced the trails of his original journey and found out that places had changed. He authored a book titled “Ghost Train to the Eastern Star” that recounts such journey.

“Travels with Charley: In Search of America” is also a travelogue written by John Steinbeck. The book recounts the road trip Steinbeck took with his poodle Charley around the United States. He traveled throughout the country in a specially-made camper. His travel began in Long Island, New York, then to Maine, Pacific Northwest, Salinas Valley in California, and across to Texas, up through Deep South, and back to New York.

In 1978, “The Snow Leopard” is published and written by Peter Matthiessen. It won the 1980 National Book Award for Nonfiction. The book recounts Matthiessen’s two-month journey to Crystal Mountain, in the Dolpo region on the Tibetan Plateau in the Himalayas.

More recently, the “In a Sunburned Country” is a 2000 travelogue book about Australia. Best-selling travel writer Bill Bryson wrote the book. The original title of the book was Down Under, but it was also published as Walk About. The latter included Down Under and another Bryson’s books in one volume.